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Accueil > Press review > A closer look at Catholic Social Teaching just for women

A closer look at Catholic Social Teaching just for women

Aleteia – 06/11/21

A new study by Endow brings into focus the history and meaning of Catholic Social Teaching — especially for women.

Have you ever wondered what Catholic Social Teaching is, exactly? Even many people who are Catholic haven’t heard of it, but the concept is having a resurgence in recent years. A beautifully written new study unpacks the history and meaning behind the phrase, helping us understand this important part of Church teaching.

Catholic Social Teaching refers to the body of Church’s wisdom on social, political, and economic matters. More specifically, it includes a collection of Magisterial documents addressing these issues, starting with Pope Leo XIII’s Rerum Novarum in 1891. 

Because of the recent popularity of the concept, Catholic Social Teaching can seem trendy or new, but it’s actually a profound, traditional part of the deposit of faith. Yet the buzz around it conceals that it’s not always well understood. 

“While Catholic Social Teaching can be a buzzword, the actual content of the social doctrine is not as well known, especially in a nuanced way,” said Laura Zambrana, Director of Content at Endow.

Endow recently published the study on Catholic Social Teaching, which became available June 11. Endow stands for “Educating on the Nature and Dignity of Women” and the organization unites the Catholic intellectual tradition with intentional community by creating study guides and organizing women into small groups.

The new Study Guide takes a chronological approach to Catholic Social Teaching, showing the development of this body of work and how critical it is to human flourishing. This historical approach to Catholic Social Teaching begins with Creation and the Fall, continues with Christ Himself and the Gospels, and then takes a close look at key Magisterial documents and influential figures from the Modern Era. It covers the following topics, among others:

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